ASP.NET Project for VSTS Release

So you have discovered the intense desire to manage your infrastructure as code and continuously deploy with your eyes closed. It is true, continuous integration and continuous deployment, once implemented, open a whole new set of opportunities. For me personally, most attractive of these is micro-functionality. Microservices are all the rage, but on a more fundamental level, it is hard to manage complex modularity without CI and CD.

For this reason I am going to assemble a refrence ASP.NET project that will demonstrate a common sinario in which the developer and Visual Studio are removed from the deployment process and endless deployments are made possible through Azure Resource Group template parameters. In a second post I will walk through setting up the Azure side of things.

Connection Strings and Migrations with EF6

Entity Framework 7 seems to be shaping up as a key part of my development stack.  However there are a host of things it does not yet do so I have stuck with Entity Framework 6 for most of my current development.  One of the flaws I have found in EF6 is that it is difficult to get it to use a specific connection string for code migrations. This makes automated migrations with VSTS Release even more difficult. There are even stack overflow questions about it that venture down some dark paths to get it right.

The method I have chosen when using EF6 is to make sure my migrations are clean and selectively enable automatic migrations. Then I assign a connection string per deployment as described here. So far this is the best and only way I can find that makes sense.  If you have other ideas let me know in the comments.

Looking at Infrastructure as Code, it seems like a daunting task. Especially if you are like me and have had a brush with sickening array of tools that are needed in some environments to get the job done.  Tools like Jenkins, Chef, Puppet, Ansible… sure they are OSS so they deserve support. On Azure, all you need for IaC are a couple JSON files, no extra software and no Admin involvement to get the right packages installed or make sure the OS configured correctly.

So if you want to skip to the end, grab the JSON and jump to the next post to see where VSTS uses them. I will try my best to give you a concise walk through from here on out so you can understand the things I like about this solution.

Visual Studio Solution

I will assume a level of comfort with Visual Studio, and save bits on the internet by being terse here.  From VS, choose to create a new project. From the New Project dialog select ASP.NET Web Application. For fun select MVC in the New ASP.NET Project dialog and then check WebApi.  Leave ‘Host in the cloud’ unchecked because we will be taking a different path. Click ok to create the solution.

Next we need to configure the web project with a publish profile to create a deployment package when built on VSTS. Right Click the web application project and select ‘Publish’. On the Publish Web dialog select ‘Custom’. When prompted for a name I always name it ‘Web Deploy Package’ so I can use the same build template over and over without a bunch of reconfiguring. On the next screen select a Publish method of ‘Web Deploy Package’. For a package location you should choose somewhere that will be picked up by the Artifacts step(s) in your build task. This usually defaults to a mask like “**\bin\$(BuildConfiguration)\**”, so if you choose your “bin\Release” directory you can get going quickly. Then go ahead and click publish to see what happens. When you check things in, it is best to leave the bin directory out of your commit, so this configuration will save you that way too.

You will see that deploying a WebApi or oData project is as easy as deploying a website. Using this method you can add any service offered by Azure like Service Fabric or to setup VMs if you like mucking about at the OS level.  I hope that after you take this first step you will try some other crazy things. Just remember to delete the resource group after you play with it. As a side note, deleting a resource group in Azure removes everything in it. So when you get down to deploying this you can simply delete the resource group and not worry about unknown things hanging out to penny and dime you down the month.

After you have your solution with a website, right click it and add a new project.  In the Add New Project dialog select Azure Resource Group. In the Select Azure Template list select ‘Web app’ and click ok.  There are other interesting options here, but for this demo, I want to show that there is already a DB up and running that this app will connect to.

Infrastructure as Code (IAS)

Don’t be afraid. As I have written in the past, there is no need for name soup or acronym mehem. Just a JSON file and a mouse.

At the time of writing the Azure Resource Group template that I have installed is using API version ‘2015-08-01’.  You can verify this by opening the WebSite.Json in the Azure resource Group project. The default templates can certainly get you going as is. However there is no way to pass in a connection string or application configuration.  By default the template makes some junked up website name that I dislike as well so we will tweak that too.

In the WebSite.json we want to add website name and connection string so we can assign them during release. First you want to add parameters for `websiteName` and `connectionstring` as shown in this Gist. You can simply delete the websiteName variable and replace all instances of `variables(‘webSiteName’)` with `parameters(‘webSiteName’)`. Then you need to add the section that does the inserting of the values to the WebApp environment in the `Microsoft.Web/sites` section as seen in the gist.

NEXT

I hope this gets you on your way, and perhaps lets you see the potential of parameterized Azure IaC. Next you should commit this to your project on VSTS. (Although you could just as easily use GitHub with VSTS Build and Release) In the next article I will walk you through configuring Azure to deploy the same code to different environments with their own connection strings.

git the code here

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ASP.NET Project for VSTS Release

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